The Chicago Marathon and One Year Later

I have some exciting news, I managed to make it through the Chicago Marathon lottery and be selected as a runner this October! I actually didn’t plan on running a marathon this year, after my first one last fall I was pretty content with just riding out this season with a handful of half marathons and some 10ks. Then one of my closest friends, Ashlee (who was also my relay partner for the Martha’s Vineyard 20 Miler), decided she wanted Chicago to be her first marathon this fall. I couldn’t pass up the chance to run Chicago and celebrate Ashlee’s first marathon with her, so I threw my name into the lottery. How we both managed to be selected out of 70,000 entrants is beyond me but I can’t wait for October 12, and there’s some serious training to do before then!

On a much different and more somber note, I can’t write a post on April 15th without recognizing what this day meant a year ago, and how the Boston and running communities have changed since. The morning of April 15th 2013, I was interviewing runners at the Boston Marathon starting line. For some this was one marathon of many, for others this was their first, and I was so incredibly excited for them. That joy and excitement for them that morning quickly changed to fear and angst later that day. I have friends who were affected and family members of friends who were affected on April 15th, as many people do. Thinking back on that day, that entire week really, it feels surreal, like a dream almost. Now we’re a year later, and it’s inspiring to hear how so many of the victims have been able to make unbelievable amounts of progress since they were injured, injuries that are both visible and those that are not. Their strength is something I honestly can’t fathom.

I can’t really watch the footage they’re replaying on the news and I don’t really want to revisit all of the emotions from that week. I’d rather look ahead, and you better believe I will be out there this coming Marathon Monday, cheering on the runners of the 118th Boston Marathon!

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Recipe-Testing the Runner’s World Cookbook

Last week I came to the realization that even though I pre-ordered the Runner’s World Cookbook a while back, and drooled over almost every single page, I’ve actually made NOTHING from it. What’s wrong with me?! Not only is the Runner’s World Cookbook filled with delicious runner-friendly recipes approved by Runner’s World cooking specialists, each recipe is categorized for an active lifestyle. There are recipes for pre-run, recovery, low-calorie, gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan, and quick meals so it’s easy to find exactly the type of meal you’re looking for! Continue reading

Clothes Don’t Make the Runner, But They Sure Do Help!

Last week we talked about finding the right running shoes, this week we’re talking about the right running clothes. Sorry guys, but for this one I can only share my thoughts on women’s running apparel!

Quick run through on the basics, we’ll keep this simple. You want to wear clothes that are well-fitting, nothing baggy that’s going to get in the way (and get really annoying) during your run. You can spend an arm and a leg on gear – but by no means do you have to! In terms of materials, aim for fabrics that are light in weight and don’t absorb a lot of moisture – for when you get really super sweaty caught in a rainstorm. When all else fails, wear something that makes you feel good. Never underestimate the motivation a new workout wardrobe can provide.

Now on to the good stuff, brands. Let’s do some love/hate. Brands I love: lululemon, Old Navy Active, and Nike. Lululemon is a leader in the women’s athletic apparel market and sell clothes that not only work well, they’re super stylish too and have creative designs. Some favorites are the run: inspire crop II, the run: swiftly tech long sleeve, the energy bra, and of course the scuba hoodie. Also, their winter running gear is fantastic, bar none. The one downside to lululemon is their high-end prices. You’re getting top-notch quality, but you’re also going to have to pay a premium for it. Enter Old Navy’s Active line.

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